Speed cameras have often been called a ‘flash for cash’ but a trial in Sweden is putting some of that cash into the hands of drivers who do the right thing.

 


The speed camera lottery trial, supported by the Swedish National Society for Road Safety, is part of a series of innovative programs, sponsored by Volkswagen.

 

The program is designed to encourage people to think of new ideas to help change road user behaviour.

 

The “Speed Camera Lottery” was announced as the winning concept and turns conventional speed camera use on its head, and here’s how works.

 


A speed camera in Stockholm was programmed to photograph every vehicle passing through an intersection.

 


Drivers who were speeding were fined and the paid fines are then placed into a money pool. Drivers who were not speeding were sent a lottery ticket for a chance to win a share of collected fines.

 


Over three days, almost 25,000 cars were photographed, although no numbers are available that show how many were caught speeding. The experiment was able to reduce the average speed of cars travelling through a school zone from 32km/h before the system’s installation to 25km/h.

 


The Swedish road traffic authority is now considering expanding the experiment to include kindergartens and residential areas using a series of portable systems.

 


It’s an interesting concept and while there might be privacy concerns surrounding the idea of every motorist being filmed, it does show positive reinforcement is the very best way to encourage a change in behaviour.